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  • Politics Aside: Pursuing Development in Zimbabwe's Biggest Slum

    1052734735-pioneers.2010-politics

    In 1986, a local board of commissioners - the equivalent of a municipal council - was appointed in the informal settlement of Epworth with two mandates: to facilitate the registration of land titles and to promote the local economy. Formalizing la...

    Pioneers of Participation Case Study Series, Cape Town: Islandla Institute, 2010.

    In 1986, a local board of commissioners - the equivalent of a municipal council - was appointed in the informal settlement of Epworth with two mandates: to facilitate the registration of land titles and to promote the local economy. Formalizing land titles in Epworth, however, posed a threat to the use of empty plots for grazing by many residents. Many of the informal settlers hence refused to cooperate with the local board and even opposed the proposal to hold local elections...
  • Not about Knowledge, but Numbers? An Examination of the Notion of Stakeholder Participation and t...

    1052734389-thompson.2003-not

    This paper continues research on citizenship, science and risk, examining the nexus between ‘developmental expertise’ on water management and technological innovation, and the recent developmental stress on local participation. It examines the...

    Thompson, L

    UWC Working Paper, No. 1, Citizenship, Participation and Accountability series, 2003.

    This paper continues research on citizenship, science and risk, examining the nexus between ‘developmental expertise’ on water management and technological innovation, and the recent developmental stress on local participation. It examines the ways in which water as a scarce resource has featured in global and national policy discourses, with particular attention to the question of the governance of water and stakeholder participation. Water as a scarce resource in international relations (IR) literature, it is argued, tends to conflate notions of community participation around regional and global resources with the management of natural resources by governments on behalf of the people. Where participation does take place it tends towards nominal representation, the principal goal seeming to be achieving parity of representation in terms of relevant ‘stakeholder’ criteria. <br/>The paper draws on case study material collated on participatory water resources management in Zimbabwe, where catchments councils have ostensibly aimed at ‘managing water’ through participatory approaches that also recognise the transboundary nature of this resource, as well as the ways in which ‘community’ identity may be more ecologically than geographically determined.

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